Don’t let Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) ruin your studies this winter.

Now the clocks have gone back and winter is officially on the way you might start to notice a change in your mood, starting to crave carbohydrates and sleeping longer. You may be experiencing SAD or how its otherwise known as Seasonal Affective Disorder or Winter Depression. In this article we share what SAD is, symptoms to look out for and ways to manage the disorder.

 

Winter scene for Seasonal affective disorder

Don’t let Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) ruin your studies this winter.

Now the clocks have gone back and winter is officially on the way you might start to notice a change in your mood, starting to crave carbohydrates and sleeping longer. You may be experiencing SAD or how its otherwise known as Seasonal Affective Disorder or Winter Depression. In this article we share what SAD is, symptoms to look out for and ways to manage the disorder.

 

 

What is SAD?

Officially, know one knows what causes Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) however research has indicated that its linked to the lack of sunlight. Which makes autumn and winter a prime time. The theory is, part of the brain called the hypothalamus stops working property due to the lack of sunlight. This could affect the production of melatonin and serotonin and the body’s internal clock. Don’t worry though, there are ways to overcome the lack of sunlight during even the harshest of winters and get you back on your feet.

 

The symptoms

Let’s first look at the other symptoms that could indicate you are suffering from SAD. We’re already touched on the craving of carbohydrates, a change in your mood and sleeping longer but these are not the only symptoms. Other symptoms include:

  • A lost in interest or pleasure in everyday activities
  • Irritability
  • Feeling lethargic
  • Feelings of despair or worthlessness

 

SAD Treatment

If you think you are suffering from Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) please speak to your GP. They will be able to advise you on the treatment that is best for you. Treatment could include but not limited to: getting more natural sunlight, light therapy: using a special lamp or bulb to get the illusion of sunlight or talk therapy.

 

If you think you might be suffering from Seasonal Affective Disorder please speak to a professional and make an appointment.

For more tips on staying healthy while studying, find our wellness blogs here >>

Credit to: http://www.nhs.uk

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